Tisi’s homily for St. Vigil: not to the obsession with the stopwatch, but to the “useless” of Love. Don’t get used to the war – Chronicle

TRENTO. The homily delivered today in the cathedral by Archbishop Lauro Tisi for the solemn Mass of St. Vigil focuses on the theme of love. “The dead end impoverishes love, the free is generative,” said the prelate, who today will also deliver the Letter to the community, entitled “The Way.”

“The shed blood of Christ reconciles, rather than produces anger, because it leaves behind the category of utility. The dead end impoverishes love, takes away its creative and innovative strength, cuts off its wings. “

The clear words of Archbishop Lauro Tisi resonate in the cathedral of Trento in the homily. like Oscar Romero, Pino Puglisi and a long line of men and women who continue to generate closeness, reconciliation and peace ”.

“True love,” said Bishop Tisi, “is nourished by a series of” useless “gestures and operations: a smile, time freed from the obsession with the stopwatch, gratuitousness and joy to make room. The free is generative, the useful is destructive ”.

At this moment, adds Don Lauro, I ask the God of life not to suggest “efficient” pastoral strategies, but to give our Church men and women inhabited by the free and the useless; this is the new way of proclaiming the gospel. “

“God does not stop looking at our lives in a positive way, he is never against us, no situation leads him to turn away,” concludes the archbishop not without having expressed the dream of seeing a Diocese willing to “” Acquire a deep familiarity. with the Word of God, to be able to experience the irrevocable love of God for each man and woman ”.

At the end of the celebration, Monsignor Tisi, according to tradition from the beginning of his episcopate, gave to the faithful the new Letter to the Community entitled “The Way.”

At 6 pm, again in the cathedral, during the Vespers prayer by Monsignor Tisi, the 14th century Marian fresco that came to light during the restoration of the Cathedral will be “unveiled”.

THE FULL TEXT OF THE HOMILY

“Ye that were far off, ye were made neighbors by the blood of Christ” (Eph 2:12).
How can shed blood become reconciliation, bring distant ones closer? How can the violent death of an innocent person produce closeness, communion, reconciliation?
At the heart of Christianity is this incredible announcement: the violent death of an innocent, Jesus Christ, is an explosion of life that unites and reconciles. The fraternity, the given life, which for two thousand years has continued to be generated, despite many contradictions, has its source and beginning in the historical fact of the death of Jesus.
Thanks to the death of Jesus of Nazareth, saints such as Oscar Romero, Pino Puglisi and a long line of men and women continue to generate closeness, reconciliation and peace (in early July a group of teenagers from the Padre Nostro reception center Brancaccio). founded by Blessed Pino Puglisi).
What is the decisive element at the heart of the Christian paradox? The shed blood of Christ reconciles, rather than produces anger, because it leaves behind the cumbersome approach that organizes life around the category of “useful.” Destroying life, impoverishing it, is the deadly question: “What do I need?”. The dead end of the “useful” impoverishes love, takes away the creative and innovative force, cuts off its wings. On the other hand, true love is nourished by a whole series of “useless” gestures and operations: a smile, time freed from the obsession with the stopwatch, gratuitousness and joy to give space. The free is generative, the useful is destructive.
It is touching to think how our Church, as St. Vigil reminds us in her letters, has its origins in the shed blood of Sisini, Martyrdom and Alexander: “I was a spectator, I confess, in the midst of these mysteries and I watched. the ashes of the saints. I who did not deserve to participate in his destiny, including the sublimity of that grace ”, Vigili confides to Saint John Chrysostom.
At this time I ask the God of life not to suggest “efficient” pastoral strategies, but to give to our Church men and women inhabited by the free and the “useless”; this is the new way of proclaiming the Gospel. Not a description of the work of things to do, but a revolutionary way of being in a relationship: that of the servant who lives for others.
In Christ, the cornerstone “the whole building grows in order to be a holy temple in the Lord” (Eph 2:21). The term “order” does not enjoy much audience, it is perceived in a somewhat sinister way; orderly life is sometimes synonymous with a boring, mortified, framed life. Surely there is an order that conveys the will to dominate, the allergy to novelty. The order that springs from Jesus, the cornerstone, is the feast of maximum creativity and freedom. From the infamous stake, Jesus manages to go beyond violence, sarcasm and insults, maintaining a positive view of man: “they do not know what they are doing” (Lk 23:24). It is irreducible in its good human thinking, in the protection of its positivity.
Contemplating the way Jesus dies, we have the sure documentation: God does not stop looking at our lives in a positive way. None of us is residual stone, damn human. Contrary to current opinion, God is never against us, no situation leads him to turn away. Whoever has this experience knows a new way of ordering life, the one offered to us by the Gospel of John: “The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.” The other is the horizon of my life, my reason for being, my need, my life. Only those who adopt this style can claim to know life. My dream is to reactivate, from the autumn, a broad movement, which will lead the communities of our diocese to acquire a deep familiarity with the Word of God, to be able to experience the irrevocable love of God for each man. and woman. I would like to realize what Pope Benedict says in Verbum Domini, with the hope that the pastoral action will start from the Word of God: “It is not a question of adding some meetings to the parish or the diocese, but of to see that in the activities of Christian communities, they really care about the personal encounter with Christ that is communicated to us in his Word ”.

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